Mr. Annese (a-niece)

Phone: 352-671-4900

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

ASE Master Technician with L1 Credentials ASE G1-Maintenance & Light Repair Certified ASE HVAC-609 Certified Florida Automobile Dealers Association Certified (FADA)

Mr. Annese (a-niece)

My mother was the first of seven brothers and sisters to migrate to the United States from Furnari, Province of Messina, Sicily, Italy. I was the first of many grandchildren born in America. I grew up in New York State with the best Italian food imaginable in a family rich in tradition. From the seven fish’s feasts during the winter holidays, to the family cookouts and gatherings in the summer, we were always together and always celebrating something. My father passed on at a very young age. He was only 47 years-of-age. I was just 14 when he became ill. It devastated our family and life would not be the same.

 

I began taking things apart in our garage and basement at a very young age. At that time, I was not able to put any of it back together. I pretty much destroyed everything I put my hands on. It was a learning process. Over time, I started figuring some of it out. At age 16, I took a summer job at the county garage, pumping gas and cleaning county vehicles. Watching the technicians as they worked made me feel like that is what I wanted to do. At that point, I started tinkering with cars. Essentially, I screwed up the majority of what I tinkered with. Again, it was a learning process.

 

After high school, I went on to enroll in a technical institute. Over the next three years, I learned all that I could about engine machining and engine repair. My instructor would become my first automotive mentor. My second automotive mentor would be my Uncle Tony. He was a technician for Flying Tigers airlines, later taken over by Federal Express. He helped me understand the real-world side of automotive and aircraft repair. My third automotive mentor was my Foreman at the first actual dealership I ever worked, which was always my goal…to become a new car dealership technician. This man was a diagnostic genius and he more or less took me under his wing. In hindsight, he must have seen some sort of potential in me. Finally, my last (so far) automotive mentor was an instructor with Chrysler Corporation. He was a former university electronics professor recruited by Lee Iacocca to teach Chrysler Technicians the ins and outs of automotive electronics, knowing he would be pushing newer technologies as he rebuilt Chrysler Corporation. This instructor made me understand how critical it would be for me in my future to learn all I could about computers, networking, electronics, and fuel systems management.

 

The automotive industry has always been very good to me. It provided me with the necessary income to start and raise a family successfully, and it kept me from ever having to stand in an unemployment line.  It provided the freedom to relocate when necessary without loss of income. It provides for pride in the quality of work we produce. It helps to fulfill the needs of industry. It is a skill respected by most everyone. It provides us with the means to address other issues in our lives, by developing significant diagnostic capabilities along with important observational skills. It is moderately physical, which aids in keeping us strong and fit throughout our lifetime. In short, learning and participating in the automotive industry is essentially a no-brainer where career choices are concerned. As technology shifts, even to the extent that cars are no longer as relevant as they are today, the technician is going to evolve and adapt to whatever technology has taken its place. A technician’s income always keeps pace with inflation. There are many opportunities within the automotive industry. Some involve fixing cars, while some do not; service advisors, sales, office work, management, and even self-employment are just a few options to name.

 

It’s been almost five decades since I first picked up a wrench. Ten years ago I decided it was time for me to try to pass on some of what I know. Since then I have found that teaching is very rewarding in so many ways. I am grateful for the opportunity to teach others and to provide others with a career that will never let them down…