• 3/11

     

    READING

    CKLA Unit 6

    Contemporary Fiction

    • theme
    • compare/contrast literature
    • text structure
    • integration of information from texts

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    SELECTION VOCABULARY 

    Suffixes: Test on Tuesday, 3/12

    -est – used to show superiority                       

    -less - without

    -ic – of, related to, or characterized by           

    -ful – full of

    -ly – in some manner                                      

    -ness – state of

     

    Science Vocabulary Study Guide:  The Rock Cycle (Test on Wednesday, 3/13)

    1. rock: a group of solid minerals that are joined together into one mass
    2. mineral: a solid, nonliving material that forms in nature
    3. rock cycle: the process by which the three types of rocks are formed and reformed from the materials in the Earth
    4. igneous: rock that forms when melted rock cools and hardens
    5. sedimentary: rock that forms when small rock pieces and other materials settle and then get squeezed or cemented together
    6. metamorphic: rock that has been changed by heat or pressure
    7. luster: how light reflects off a mineral’s surface
    8. streak: the color of a mineral in powdered form
    9. hardness: how easily a mineral can be scratched
    10. cleavage: when a mineral breaks along a smooth, flat surface

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    SPELLING

    No new words this week.      

           

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    WRITING

    Figurative Language

    Expository: Informative & Opinion

     

     

    JOURNAL & HANDWRITING

    1. Journal:  Daily, students will write at least five complete and interesting sentences to a given prompt.  They will be graded on their focus, organization, support, and conventions.
    2. Handwriting:  Once we have finished learning all cursive letters, students will practice through spelling and select classroom assignments.  FYI:  Their trace-and-copy cursive papers are highlighted based on how they are forming their letters.  The following are some of the reasons their words may get highlighted:  for going above or below the lines; not retracing over their lines, but instead forming a loop where there shouldn’t be one; not dotting i’s or crossing t’s; picking up the pencil and making stray marks that make the letters look “hairy”; not slanting their letters properly, etc.  They have been told to look at my example and trace it before writing their own. They may retrace my example as many times as needed in order to get the right feel of the letter(s).

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    GRAMMAR 

    Adjectives That Compare

    (1) Add -er to most adjectives to compare two people, places, or things.  (Ex.: I am taller than you.)

    (2) Add -est to most adjectives to compare more than two.  (Ex.: I am the tallest in my class.)

    (3) For adjectives ending in e, drop the e before adding -er or -est.  (Ex.:  free = freer, freest)

    (4) For adjectives ending in a consonant and y, change the y to i before adding -er or -est.  (Ex.:  chilly = chillier, chilliest)

    (5) For adjectives that have a single vowel before a final consonant, double the final consonant before adding -er or -est.  (Ex.: big = bigger, biggest)

    (6) For their test on Thursday, the students will have to read select sentences and determine if the underlined adjective is the correct form or the correct spelling.  They will also have to use the correct form of given adjectives to correctly complete select sentences.

      

    Unit 5 Review:

    Adjectives

    (1) Adjectives are words that describe nouns or pronouns.  For example, adjectives may tell what a noun or pronoun looks, sounds, smells, tastes, or feels like.  (Ex.: Florida has big mosquitoes.)

    (2) Adjectives may be placed before a noun or pronoun. 

    (3) Adjectives may come after the words a, an, and the.   (Ex.: The large dog had a tiny bone.)

    (4) Adjectives may follow a linking verb.  (Ex.: This book is difficult.)

    (5) Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns.  (Ex.: They couldn’t get used to Florida summers.)

    (6) A proper adjective begins with a capital letter. 

    (7) Common adjectives are not formed from proper nouns.  Do not capitalize common adjectives.

    (8) Do not use a comma to separate a single adjective from a noun.  When only two adjectives are used together, separate them with a comma or and.  Do not use both.  (Ex.: The dog had clean, sharp teeth.)

    (9) Use commas to separate three or more adjectives in a series.  When you are using only two adjectives before a noun, some adjectives do not need to be separated with commas.  These adjectives describe color, size, or age.  (Ex.:  She was a woman with short gray hair.)

    (10) Do not use commas or and to separate a common adjective from a proper adjective.  (Ex.: They couldn’t get used to the hot Alabama summers.)

    Articles

    (1) The words a, an, and the are special adjectives called articles

    (2) Use a and an with singular nouns. 

    (3) Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound (a glass). 

    (4) Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound (an elephant). 

    (5) Use the with singular nouns that name a particular person, place, or thing (the wedding). 

    (6) Use the before all plural nouns (the townspeople). 

     

     

    MECHANICS

    (1) In a play, use a colon (:) between each character’s name and his or her words.

    (2) Do not use quotation marks around dialogue in a play.

    (3) Start a new line each time a new character is speaking.

    (4) Use parentheses () around stage directions. These are directions that tell what characters do on stage or how they say their words out loud.

    Example: GEORGE (loudly): It’s right here, Mr. Taylor! (George hold up the book.)

     

    REVIEW:

    (1) A comma tells the reader to pause between the words that it separates.

    (2) Use commas to separate three or more words in a series.

    For example: We enjoyed the mountains, the trees, and the clouds in the park.

    (3) Do not use a comma after the last word in a series.

    (4) Begin the greeting and closing of a letter with a capital letter.

    (5) Use a comma after the greeting and closing in a letter.

    (6) Use a comma between the names of a city and state.

    (7) Use a comma between the day and the year in a date.

    (8) Use the following abbreviations for people’s titles: Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr. (Doctor), Jr. (Junior), Sr. (Senior)

    (9) Use U.S. Postal Service abbreviations for the state name.

    (10) Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a speaker’s exact words.

    (11) Begin a quotation with a capital letter.

    (12) Do not use quotation marks when you do not use the speaker’s exact words.

    (13) A contraction is a shortened form of two words.

    (14) A contraction can be made by combining certain verbs with the word not.

    (15) An apostrophe (‘) shows that the letter o has been left out. (Or other letters as well!)

    Examples of contractions: is + not = isn’t, did + not = didn’t

     

    Quotation Marks Review: 

    (1) Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a speaker’s exact words. (Ex.: “Will you let me use your skates?” her sister asked.

    (2) Begin a quotation with a capital letter.

    (3) A direct quotation can come at the beginning or at the end of a sentence. Do not place quotation marks around the words that explain who is talking. (Ex.: Ms. Diaz asked, “Have you turned in your homework?”

    (4) When a quotation comes last in a sentence, use a comma to separate the quotation from the words that tell who is speaking. Put the end mark inside the last quotation marks. (Ex.: Brittany said, “All birds have feathers.”)

    (5) When a quotation that is a statement or a command comes first in a sentence, put a comma inside the last quotation marks. (Ex.: “Say hello to Pauline,” Renee suggested.)

    (6) If the quotation is a question or an exclamation, put the question mark or exclamation point inside the last quotation marks. A period always follows the last word in the sentence. (Ex.: “Pauline is a parrot!” I exclaimed.)

    (7) Do not use quotation marks when you do not use the speaker’s exact words. (Ex.: She said you were going to have to clean your room.)

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    MATH

    Chapter 13: Perimeter and Area

    • perimeter
    • area
    • area of combined rectangles
    • find unknown measures
    • problem solving/find the area

     

    Multiplication Tables: Weekly Multiplication Tests: The students voted on the following schedule:

    • 0’s (tested 8/14)
    • 1’s (tested 8/15)
    • 2’s (tested 8/20)
    • 5’s (tested 8/24)
    • 10’s (tested 8/31)
    • 11’s (tested 9/7)
    • 12’s (tested 9/14)
    • 3’s (tested 9/21)
    • 4’s (tested 9/28)
    • 7’s (tested 10/5)
    • 9’s (tested 10/12)
    • 6’s (tested 10/19)
    • 8’s (tested 10/26)

     ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    SCIENCE  

    Rocks & Minerals

    Science:  Rocks and Minerals Vocabulary Study Guide: Test on Wednesday, 3/13 (practice is on Quizlet as well)

    1. rock: a group of solid minerals that are joined together into one mass
    2. mineral: a solid, nonliving material that forms in nature
    3. rock cycle: the process by which the three types of rocks are formed and reformed from the materials in the Earth
    4. igneous: rock that forms when melted rock cools and hardens
    5. sedimentary: rock that forms when small rock pieces and other materials settle and then get squeezed or cemented together
    6. metamorphic: rock that has been changed by heat or pressure
    7. luster: how light reflects off a mineral’s surface
    8. streak: the color of a mineral in powdered form
    9. hardness: how easily a mineral can be scratched
    10. cleavage: when a mineral breaks along a smooth, flat surface

     

     ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    SOCIAL STUDIES

    DBQ: Why Did Spain Settle St. Augustine? 

    Chapter 4: Europeans Come to Florida

     

     Social Studies Chapter 4 Vocabulary Study Guide (Tested on 2/8)

    1) artisan - skilled worker               

    2) chickee - Seminole house made of a log frame with a thatch roof

    3) colony - settlement of people set up by one country in another country                     

    4) convert - to change from one religion to another                                                    

    5) expedition - journey made for a special purpose

    6) friars - men who performed Roman Catholic services

    7) militia - army of citizens trained for war

    8) mission - church and settlement where religion is taught

    9) sofkee - Seminole drink made from corn and water                                                

    10) thatch - plant material, such as straw or palm leaves, used to cover a roof