AICE
  • Cambridge International AS and A Level English Language gives learners the opportunity to study English language and its use in contemporary communication. It aims to encourage a critical response to texts in a range of forms, styles and contexts, and to promote skills of communication, reading, research and analysis. Through their study, learners will develop an ability to read and analyse material, gaining further knowledge and understanding of English language features and issues, and writing clearly, accurately, creatively and effectively for different purposes and audiences.

Summer Reading

  • English as a Global Language Second Edition

    by David Crystal Year Published:

    This is required summer reading for the AICE English Language A level course.

    I have included a pdf version on my teacher webpage for your convenience.

    David Crystal, world authority on the English language, presents a lively and factual account of the rise of English as a global language and explores the whys and wherefores of the history, current status and future potential of English as the international language of communication. English has been lauded as the most 'successful' language ever, with 1,500 million speakers worldwide; but Crystal avoids taking sides and tells the story in a measured but engaging way, backed by facts and figures. This new edition of his classic book includes new material (on the vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation of New Englishes), footnotes, new tables, and a full bibliography. There are updates throughout. This is a book for anyone of any nationality concerned with English: teachers, students, language professionals, politicians, general readers and anyone with a love of the language.

    Comments (-1)
  • 1984

    by George Orwell Year Published:

    If you did not read this novel already for 9th grade, I highly reccomend it - especially considering the manner in which it conveys language, and we will be delving into language shifts as a unit of study this year.

     

    Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell’s chilling prophecy about the future. And while 1984 has come and gone, his dystopian vision of a government that will do anything to control the narrative is timelier than ever...

    The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command.

    Winston Smith toes the Party line, rewriting history to satisfy the demands of the Ministry of Truth. With each lie he writes, Winston grows to hate the Party that seeks power for its own sake and persecutes those who dare to commit thoughtcrimes. But as he starts to think for himself, Winston can’t escape the fact that Big Brother is always watching...

    A startling and haunting vision of the world, 1984 is so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish. No one can deny the influence of this novel, its hold on the imaginations of multiple generations of readers, or the resiliency of its admonitions—a legacy that seems only to grow with the passage of time.

    Comments (-1)
  • Animal Farm

    by George Orwell Year Published:

    George Orwell's timeless and timely allegorical novel—a scathing satire on a downtrodden society’s blind march towards totalitarianism.

    “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

    A farm is taken over by its overworked, mistreated animals. With flaming idealism and stirring slogans, they set out to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality. Thus the stage is set for one of the most telling satiric fables ever penned—a razor-edged fairy tale for grown-ups that records the evolution from revolution against tyranny to a totalitarianism just as terrible.

    Comments (-1)
  • Lord of the Flies

    by William Golding Year Published:

    Before The Hunger Games there was Lord of the Flies

    Lord of the Flies remains as provocative today as when it was first published in 1954, igniting passionate debate with its startling, brutal portrait of human nature. Though critically acclaimed, it was largely ignored upon its initial publication. Yet soon it became a cult favorite among both students and literary critics who compared it to J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye in its influence on modern thought and literature.

    Labeled a parable, an allegory, a myth, a morality tale, a parody, a political treatise, even a vision of the apocalypse, Lord of the Flies has established itself as a true classic.

    Comments (-1)
  • Slaughterhouse Five

    by Kurt Vonnegut Year Published:

    Slaughterhous-Five is one of the world's great anti-war books. Centering on the infamous fire-bombing of Dresden, Billy Pilgrim's odyssey through time reflects the mythic journey of our own fractured lives as we search for meaning in what we are afraid to know.

    Comments (-1)
  • The Catcher in the Rye

    by J.D. Salinger Year Published:

    Ever since it was first published in 1951, this novel has been the coming-of-age story against which all others are judged. Read and cherished by generations, the story of Holden Caulfield is truly one of America's literary treasures.

    Comments (-1)
  • The Great Gatsby

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald Year Published:

    The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers.

    The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

    The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.

    Comments (-1)