Interpreters

  • An educational interpreter’s primary role is to provide language access and language modeling in the classroom.  They provide growth in many key areas – cognitive, social, and linguistic. Educational interpreters are also members of the educational faculty responsible for working with those involved in your child’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to ensure goals are being applied and accomplished.  Interpreters must write a comprehensive communication plan that will aid in understanding your child’s communication and language strengths and areas that need improvement.  Marion County prides itself on hiring interpreters that exceed the state minimal requirements and commitment to continuing interpreter education.

     

    Sign Language Interpreting Agencies in the Marion County Area

    Your deaf or hard of hearing child is entitled to have a sign language interpreter in both one-on-one situations as well as group settings.  This service is needed in a variety of settings, such as performing arts, K-12 schools, post-secondary education, technical trainings, mental health, hospitals, doctor offices, court rooms, law offices, and the government…. Just to name a few!  Below are agencies that your doctors’ offices, law offices, hospitals, etc. can contact.  Please note, it is not the deaf person (or parents) responsibility to pay for an interpreter.  If an agency or office refuses to provide these legally mandated equal access services please contact the Center for Independent Living and ask for Colleen Metcalf.  Her contact information is_____________________________.

     

    For interpreting services please give the hiring individuals these numbers:

     

     

    • C.H.I.P.S. (please indent here to show they are under Sign Language Interpreters)
      • Mary Jo Lawson at (352) 795-5000

     

     

    Interpreting Resources:

     

    Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment

    “Describes issues related to interpreting for children, with a focus on social interaction and learning. It describes the role of the classroom interpreter, the skills needed to be an effective interpreter, resources helpful to interpreters, learning issues of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, and training opportunities.”

     

    RID

    “The Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf strives to advocate for best practices in interpreting, professional development for practitioners and for the highest standards in the provision of interpreting services for diverse users of languages that are signed or spoken.”

     

    FRID

     The principal purposes of this corporation are to initiate, sponsor, promote and execute policies and activities that shall further the profession of interpreting and transliterating, to include, but not be limited to American Sign Language, English and Spanish.

     

    Gallaudet Interpreting Resources

    Five publications have been developed for school administrators, educators, educational interpreters, students, and parents to support language access for deaf and hard of hearing children in general education settings.

     

    Professional Growth & CEU Opportunities

     

    interpreters

Last Modified on September 13, 2016