Creative Photography and Digital Art Imaging

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    Creative Photography I; course # 0108310

     Introduction to photographic history, theory, techniques and materials. Students will explore compositional design principles and elements; along with the fundamentals of portrait, landscape, and studio photography. Produce Photos using a variety of techniques and concepts.
    Students will organize their photographs, as an on-going-activity, in a portfolio/binder. Students will write about why they took a picture of a specific image, emotions expressed in the photo, what design elements worked to add interest to the photo, and reflect on future possibilities that may enhance images they photograph.

    Creative Photography II; course # 0108320

    Students produce Photographic work that reflects varied photographic processes and techniques that communicate through formal, expressive, and conceptual elements. Continue to explore photographic history, theory, techniques and materials. Students will continue to investigate their creative use of compositional design principles and elements; along with the fundamentals of portrait, landscape, and studio photography.
    Students will organize their photographs, as an on-going-activity, in a portfolio/binder. Students will write about why they took a picture of a specific image, emotions expressed in the photo, what design elements worked to add interest to the photo, and reflect on future possibilities that may enhance images they photograph.

    Creative Photography III Honors; course # 0108330

    Students produce photographic works of value that contain photographic images as visual communication and documentation of ideas, feelings, and to evoke responses in relation to historical or cultural references at an intermediate level. Explore the use of digital photography and technology in art processes. Students will use critical thinking and analysis of work for their portfolio demonstrating photographic skills and critical thinking.  Continue to explore photographic history, theory, techniques and materials. Students will continue to investigate their creative use of compositional design principles and elements; along with portrait, landscape, and studio photography.
    Students will organize their photographs, as an on-going-activity, in a portfolio/binder. Students will write about why they took a picture of a specific image, emotions expressed in the photo, what design elements worked to add interest to the photo, and reflect on future possibilities that may enhance images they photograph.
     

    Course Number 0109320 – Portfolio Development: Two Dimensional Design Honors(FORMERLY-Photo IV )


    Students work in a self-directed environment to develop a portfolio showing a body of their own work that visually explores a particular artistic concern, articulated and supported by a written artist's statement. Artists may work in, but are not limited to, content in drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, traditional photography, digital photography, and/or new media and emerging technologies that demonstrate understanding of design principles as applied to a 2-dimensional surface. Students regularly reflect on aesthetics and art issues individually and as a group, and manipulate the structural elements of art and organizational principles of design to create 2-dimensional works of art that are progressively more innovative and representative of the student's artistic and cognitive growth. In keeping with the rigor expected in an accelerated setting, students’ portfolios show personal vision and artistic growth over time, mastery of visual art skills and techniques, and evidence of sophisticated analytical and problem-solving skills based on their structural, historical, and cultural knowledge. Students are self-directed and display readiness for high levels of critical thinking, research, conceptual thinking, and creative risk-taking. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.

     



     

     

    Digital Art Imaging 1   Course Number 0108370

    Students explore the fundamental concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications of digital imaging to create original work. Students produce digital still images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers to measure artistic growth. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.

     

     

    Digital Art Imaging 2   Course Number 0108380

    Students explore and develop concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications to design, create, print, and display original two-dimensional graphic and fine works of art. As they become more adept at using the tools and techniques available to them, students design digital still images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own designs and images and those of their peers to measure artistic growth with increasing sophistication. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.

     

     

    Digital Art Imaging 3 Honors   Course Number  0108390

    Students explore advanced topics through project-based work, becoming more self-directed in their acquisition and use of concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications to design, create, print, and display original two-dimensional graphic and fine works of art in print and web formats. As they become more adept at using the tools and techniques available to them, students design and produce digital still images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own designs and images and those of their peers to measure artistic growth with increasing sophistication and independence to promote risk-taking in the completion of conceptually based, self-directed work. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.

    GENERAL NOTES

    Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work. Through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted, students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning.

     



     

     

     The Creative Photography/Digital Art Imaging 

    Rubric Categories are based on the

    Big Ideas in the Arts Standards:

    1. Critical Thinking and Reflection: Critical and creative thinking, self-expression and communication with others are central to the arts.

    2. Skills, Techniques and Processes: Through dance, music theatre and visual art, students learn that beginners, amateurs, and professionals benefit from working to improve and maintain skills over time.

    3. Organizational Structure: Works in dance, music, theatre and visual art are organized by elements and principles that guide creators, interpreters and responders.

    4. Historical and Global Connections: Experiences in the arts foster understanding, acceptance and enrichment among individuals, groups, and cultures from around the world and across time.

    5. Innovation, Technology and the Future: Curiosity, creativity and the challenges of artistic problems drive innovation and adaptation of new and emerging technologies.

     

     



     

     

    © 2013 Adobe Systems Incorporated Principles and rules of copyright

    Principles and rules of copyright

    • Copyright is protection for intellectual property.
    • Intellectual property consists of anything an individual has written or created. It might be music, text, pictures, photographs, sounds, and so on.
    • Fair use doctrine is part of the copyright laws. It states that limited portions of material may be used without written permission for certain purposes, such as reporting the news or schoolwork. It doesn’t define “limited,” though, so be sure you don’t overuse material. The fair use doctrine requires you to give credit to the author or creator of any material you use.
    • Derivative works are copyrighted materials that have been altered or changed. Such material is protected by copyright laws. If you alter a copyrighted photograph by using computer software, that photograph is still protected, and you may not use it without written permission.
    • Academic standards for copyrighted material are higher than others. Because scholars and researchers study so many different ideas and are responsible for sharing those ideas with the world, they are required to satisfy higher standard of honesty. They must give credit not only when quoting someone else’s exact words but also for the ideas those words represent. As a researcher, you cannot paraphrase what someone else says and not give credit for it.
    • Bibliographies are lists of sources that have been used in research. When using the Internet for research or for design work, you need to give credit where it is due. Often, people who use graphics and images from the Internet for publication on their own web page create a list of image credits rather than a bibliography.

     

    Rules of Copyright

    1. You cannot use copyrighted material without written permission from the creator of the material (or from its

    copyright holder).

    1. Material can be protected even if it does not display the © symbol. Even if no mention is made regarding

    copyright, you must assume that all material from another source is protected.

    1. Penalties for violating copyright laws can range from mild to severe. If you break the copyright law, you might simply receive an e-mail message from the author asking you to stop using the material. If you publish the material on a website, the webmaster might shut down your site. Or you could be sued by the author or

    prosecuted by federal authorities.

    1. To make sure you are not violating any copyright law, it is important that you do the following:
    • Write or send e-mail to the author or creator and ask permission to use the material. Do not use it until you are given permission.
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    • Most important: Do not use any material if you don’t have written permission.
    1. Copyright notice is no longer required to obtain protection, but it is often beneficial. Copyright notice for

    visually perceptible material should contain the following three elements:

    • The symbol © (the letter C in a circle), or the word “Copyright,” or the abbreviation “Copr.”
    • The year of first publication
    • The name of the owner of copyright

    ◦ Example: © 2012 Adobe Systems Incorporated

    1. Copyright notice for phonorecords and sound recordings should contain the following three elements.
    • The symbol ℗ (the letter P in a circle)
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    1. The copyright notice should be affixed in such a way as to “give reasonable notice of the claim of copyright.”

     

    For more information on copyrights, visit the United States Copyright Office on the Internet at www.copyright.gov.